Check Out What A Cash Flow Statement Does Not Tell You

You probably know someone who suddenly found themselves with a negative Net Worth. If they used the equity in their home to get loans for vacations, and the latest electronics gizmos, they put themselves in a precarious situation. With the recent collapse in housing prices, their home equity no longer offsets the amount of debt they were carrying. The term we use is “under water,” when the amount owed on a property is more than the current market value of the property. Being “under water” is a huge drag on Net worth.

Though this may seem like basic information, it can be a daunting task to complete. Nowadays companies offer more than one product. Big conglomerates, like Proctor & Gamble, offer hundreds of different products in a variety of industries. By understanding each of their various branches, the better grasp you will have of their companies’ direction.

Plan trades with business discipline. Most plans cover Entries, Exits, Stops and Profit Targets. Still, no one enters a business with a few bullet points. Your trading plan must address the very defining reason of “Why trade?” What is your motivation (each day, month and quarter)? E.g. build up the children’s education fund, pay for household expenses or self-directed retirement? How robust do you want your home business to be? It’s reflected in the construction of your portfolio and trade plan.

Real estate investing can come with a lot of surprises, especially on the financial end of things. Before you invest in property, make sure you completely understand the financial statements. You should be able to regurgitate the statements and explain them in laymen terms to anyone. This is critical to your success. You don’t want to be surprised with operating costs, vacancy costs, or taxes. If you are working with an account, ask to see the cash flow examples and have it explained to you. By knowing and understanding the financial end of things, you can head off bad investments.

That means, if the husband has better understanding then he should shoulder the responsibility and vice versa. But the catch is; how do we determine which one understand financial better?

When you take out debt, or use the credit line, that influx of cash does not show up in the profit and loss statement. Neither does the repayment of said debt. This is true for bank loans, owner loans, and credit cards. As business picks up, and cash is used to repay this debt, you may show a solid profit on your P&L, but not have anything in the bank. Not to worry, your overall asset picture is better (but that’s on your balance sheet).

We all know that customers that don’t pay are simply taking money from your pocket and putting it into their own bank account. The best is to have no credit policy, and even collect cash in advance.